Ammunition available on 11 September 1885

 

 

Gun

Common

shell

Canister

shell

Sharoha

Shrapnel

Case shot

Common

siege bombs

Cast steel siege bombs

Canister

siege bombs

Charges

9 pdr steel & bronze M. 1867

755

1 685

4 039

4 592

203

 

 

 

78 000

9cm Krupp M. 1873

2 827

 

 

1 946

198

 

 

 

 

8cm Krupp M. 1873

1 005

 

 

979

198

 

 

 

 

9cm short range Krupp

19 600

 

 

5 184

2 719

 

 

 

 

8cm short range Krupp

16 270

 

 

4 400

2 072

 

 

 

 

60mm mountain Broadwell

12 333

 

 

 

721

 

 

 

 

3 pdr mountain M. 1867

871

1 495

 

 

135

 

 

 

 

4 pdr M. 1867

13 000

20 000

8 300

1 161

730

 

 

 

41 300

24 pdr long & short M. 1867

 

 

 

 

 

4 970

7 625

5 551

 

6 inch mortars M. 1867

not known

120mm guns Krupp L/25

not known

45mm guns Whitworth

not listed

 

54 961

23 180

12 339

18 262

6 976

4 970

7 625

5 551

119 300

 

Remarks :

1. The shrapnel fuzes were ineffective, new fuzes had been orderd in Russia and on the eve of the war were not yet arrived. There were only a few percussion and 7 time fuzes and primers. All the 9 pdr guns were not filled.

2. The projectiles were not filled, since there were not charges for them.

3. Part of the ammunition was at Ruse and part at Razgrad.

4. The ammunition was at Razgrad.

Source : Войната на Сръбско-Българската и Турция 1885 год., p. 101.

The table shows the amount of the ammunition available at the eve of the mobilization according with a telegram sent by the Military Minister cpt. Nikifor Nikiforov and the director of the armaments lt. Georgi Popov to the Prince Alexandar Battenberg on 11 September 1885.